Protect Children with Immigrant Parents

Founded in September 2002, FAMILIES FOR FREEDOM is a New York-based multi-ethnic defense network by and for immigrants facing and fighting deportation. We are immigrant prisoners (detainees), former immigrant prisoners, their loved ones, or individuals at risk of deportation. We come from dozens of countries, across continents. FFF seeks to repeal the laws that are tearing apart our homes and neighborhoods; and to build the power of immigrant communities as communities of color, to provide a guiding voice in the growing movement for immigrant rights as human rights.

Families for Freedom has a petition going around to support the Child Citizen Protection Act.

Learn more here.

Sign the petition here.

The Child Citizen Protection Act is an opportunity for our leaders to show that they truly value families and that the health, safety and well being of our nation’s children are among their top priority. Introduced by Representative Jose Serrano (D-NY), this bill represents a grassroots effort by families to create a safety valve for our children affected by deportations and raids. The Child Citizen Protection Act preserves the basic notion of fairness that should define the U.S. justice system—providing immigration judges with the discretion to consider the best interests of US Citizen children before ordering his or her parent deported. This bill would address some of the harshest provisions of the 1996 immigration laws that made deportation a mandatory punishment for many non-citizens.

JoJo Tran Won Asylum in the US

PhotobucketEdited 7/20/16 to add:

JoJo has contacted me and let me know that he successfully obtained asylum! Congratulations JoJo.

My friend Ally writes:

“Just a moment of your time could save my friend JoJo Tran’s life.

JoJo’s attempts at gaining asylum after being in the US for over 13 years have been denied. At this point, his only hope of staying here and safe from prosecution in Vietnam is if ICE (Immigration & Customs Enforcement) reopens his case. A team of volunteers in Seattle is trying to collect as many signatures as possible to convince them and our local politicians to lean on ICE to do this.”

More info on JoJo.

Here’s the petition.

JoJo’s story:

We are calling for US Immigration and Customs Enforcement to reopen Dung Anh “JoJo” Tran’s asylum case.

JoJo Tran fled Vietnam in 1996 fearing politically motivated persecution after helping American military veterans as a guide to view sites that the Vietnamese authorities claimed were not authorized, and being called in, questioned and threatened by the Vietnamese intelligence agency.

Since moving to Seatle shortly after his arrival in America in 1996, JoJo has been busy working and volunteering for numerous organizations in the Puget Sound area.

Our updated information from JoJo’s attorney is that March 28 is the last day of his voluntary departure period unless ICE consents to grant him some sort of stay while his petition is being considered.

Help us help this amazing man who has turned adversity and a fourteen year effort to become an American into thousands of hours of volunteering in the community he wants to call home.

Broken Families & Millions of Tax $$

h/t Wellsmus

From the New York Times:

Federal immigration officials had repeatedly told Congress that among more than half a million immigrants with outstanding deportation orders, they would concentrate on rounding up the most threatening — criminals and terrorism suspects.

Instead, newly available documents show, the agency changed the rules, and the program increasingly went after easier targets. A vast majority of those arrested had no criminal record, and many had no deportation orders against them, either.

Internal directives by immigration officials in 2006 raised arrest quotas for each team in the National Fugitive Operations Program, eliminated a requirement that 75 percent of those arrested be criminals, and then allowed the teams to include nonfugitives in their count.

In the next year, fugitives with criminal records dropped to 9 percent of those arrested, and nonfugitives picked up by chance — without a deportation order — rose to 40 percent. Many were sent to detention centers far from their homes, and deported.

Bush’s attempts to appear “tough” on immigration where just that, appearance. But his cosmetic needs created two sets of victims.

The first is immigrants and those suspected of being immigrants.

[R]andom arrests of low-level violators in residential raids not only raised a new set of legal and humanitarian issues, including allegations of entering private homes without warrants or consent and separating children from their caretakers, but was “dramatically different from how ICE has sold this program to Congress.”

The second is taxpayers.

“If we just want to arrest undocumented people,” [Michael Wishnie] said, “we can do it much more cheaply.”

Congressional financing for the fugitive operations program rose to $218 million in the 2008 fiscal year, from $9 million in 2003, as the number of seven-member teams multiplied to 104 from 8.

It’s so obvious that harassing immigrants and racially profiling brown people is totally making America safer!